Real-time Journalism: il futuro della notizia
Il Monella

Mumble mumble...

Real-time Journalism: il futuro della notizia

Ovvero: il coinvolgimento del lettore nell'era del giornalismo post-industriale.

"Il tempo della notizia – news cycle – è passato dalle 24 ore ai 24 secondiIl real-time crea coinvolgimento alla luce - non a dispetto - di questo cambiamento"

Real-time Journalism - Il futuro della notizia fra liveblogging e coinvolgimento esplora il mondo del giornalismo in diretta e lancia la sfida dell'engagement del lettore: unica, vera unità di misura del mondo digitale.  

In parallelo con la pubblicazione di questo mio primo saggio in formato ebook, viene lanciata questa pagina come primo blog collettivo italiano sul tema, e approdo naturale per tutti i naviganti italiani nel mondo del giornalismo real-time. Consideratelo come un dialogo in tempo reale, invece che una monolitica vulgata:  un viaggio comune, non un soliloquio: così come auspico che sia il giornalismo del futuro.

Siete invitati - tecnici, giornalisti, curiosi e lettori - a commentare e inviare spunti di riflessione. 

Richiedete l'accesso alla piattaforma, e vi sarà dato. Potete usare il comodo box qui sotto. L'hashtag per la discussione è #realtimejourno: gli spunti colti su Twitter nutriranno questo liveblog, e viceversa. La mia email è lillo@ilmonella.com. 

  • Everyone loves a pub...
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:29:12 PM
    Commenta ()
  • One of ARD's best services in terms of community involvement is UEFA Champions League Social Radio. We've built a web application with ScribbleLive and a live radio stream where users can submit questions during the match and many of them are answered by the radio commentators. It's almost like an ongoing conversation which is great for both sides.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:29:36 PM
    Commenta ()
  • It's great when you get large numbers actually wanting to respond and engage, around events like the Transfer Window we just see huge responses with people arguing and people just making rumours up. Basically everything you see down the pub on a Friday night and it's great fun.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:30:30 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Absolutely. And it can become a viral thing. The group of "regulars" grows with word of mouth, especially if they now where to find the coverage, when to find the coverage, and -- from this word of mouth -- what to expect from the coverage. At the end of the day, the quality of the content is king. That's the priority. That's the sell. But the hook can be all the other things possible with a liveblog/chat that the traditional article doesn't offer because of its lack of interaction.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:31:07 PM
    Commenta ()
  • We get a lot of viewers for our online chats, but not a lot of participation...are there any methods you use in particular to get viewers to become commenters and take a more interactive approach to the chat?
    Cody 8/6/2013 4:31:34 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Great answers everyone - so building a community is key but any tips on getting the community started for Cody?
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:32:21 PM
    Commenta ()
  • @ Cody: Users love it if you communicate with them directly. Chat with them. Speak to them directly.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:32:50 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Of course if you have maybe 60 comments coming in per minute or so, then that's a bit tricky. :-)
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:33:22 PM
    Commenta ()
  • And users like if you're chatting with a sense of humor - that's my experience.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:34:27 PM
    Commenta ()
  • I think everyone finds that in the beginning, we had our fun getting everyone we know to send in questions in the early days. Promotion is one thing and Social Media plays a big part in that but creating a regular placeholder for people is also a great technique. If users know the time and the place to get involved you will see the participation grow. If it's just at random times then it's harder to get the people through the door.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:34:31 PM
    Commenta ()
  • I think going into any sort of live coverage you have that feel for what topic has the most buzz. Even if you've set it up as a Q/A format, there's nothing wrong with flipping the tables. Offer up a question or a topic for debate and then use those comments from readers and their comments to jump start the exchange. Those comments will soon become questions -- or at least offer things that you can riff off of with other readers. It's possible to spur involvement by using polls or throwing an assertion (I'd guess you'd call it debate bait) out there that you know will get bites.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:35:26 PM
    Commenta ()
  • And Tom is right, personality is key. It needs to feel like a person, not something automated or corporate. Have fun with them, we all get caught up in sport being so serious sometimes, but it doesn't always have to be.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:36:03 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Perfect point Derrick. I had been typing in almost the same answer, I can spare that now. :-)
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:36:15 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Amazing - polls, humour, personality and getting your friends involved to get the ball rolling - really useful tips guys!
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:36:51 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Lets move the conversation to the nitty gritty of real-time reporting...
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:37:24 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Robert, That is something that I've been slow to embrace in some arenas, to be honest. There was always this sense when I started in journalism that nobody reads the byline. Social media and the instant nature of the coverage nowadays means the personality has to come out. You have to let readers in. Whether that's your voice, your interests, your hobbies beyond your beat -- any of that helps put a more personal touch on the conversation. Otherwise, you're right, they feel they're talking to an automaton.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:38:16 PM
    Commenta ()
  • When you’re covering a match in real-time what are the most important elements to consider? Is there anything specific that you would recommend preparing in advance?
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:38:45 PM
    Commenta ()
  • @Robin: Our users love stats. So that is something you can prepare in advance. And then spill it out in small portions.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:39:49 PM
    Commenta ()
  • You have to approach it the same way you would a match report in your prep first up. People will still expect it to be based on knowledge as well as the personality we talked about. If we fall down on the knowledge then we lose the big sports fans straight away. So that includes stats and historical data to call upon, always great to have in the armoury, especially if the live isn't 'compelling'.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:40:57 PM
    Commenta ()
  • One of the things we do with our live blog is we spark the coverage with news from the day. For baseball, the starting point is usually that day's lineup. We post it early in the afternoon, as soon as it's released, and then build the live blog from there. News will appear there first. Injury updates. Analysis on what it means. We do build stats into that so that the readers might get a sense of what to expect from the game ahead. It does serve as an advance scouting report. I think the preparation for a liveblog or a chat is pretty similar to what you would do for a feature story or a deadline article. It's all reporting.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:41:57 PM
    Commenta ()
  • I think it is very important to sense the emotional state of your community and reflect on it.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:43:13 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Very often I will comment on a user's comment by adding another twist. Sometimes I'm a bit cheeky there. But it works if it's still humorous enough.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:43:35 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Great point Derrick, something we are looking to do much more this season in football. Starting our live blogs up to 24 hours before has proved really effective in building up excitement and engagement for a live event.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:43:41 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Good to know Derrick - start the event early and build momentum with stats, team news etc...
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:43:53 PM
    Commenta ()
  • That's great advice and something we recommend our clients to do - build up the momentum before hand - there's always going to be enough news to keep readers interested!
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:44:57 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Just to follow on from that question then - do you follow any specific rules when live reporting. Do you try and include a certain proportion of reader comments/tweets/images/text or is it more instinctive than that?
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:46:02 PM
    Commenta ()
  • That's an additional answer to the previous question:

    We have a liveblog on Eintracht Frankfurt (our local Bundesliga soccer club) at hr.online.de that goes on and on. It never expires and is updated 365 days a year. It's got news in small portions with maybe two or three updates a day. This is the most successful document that we have. People come back on a daily basis, several times a day.

    Here's the link. www.hr-online.de
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:48:57 PM
    Commenta ()
  • To Robin's question on the rules of live reporting: I do try to keep in mind that the goal is to drive traffic to our coverage and break news on our site whenever possible. We're out to highlight The Post-Dispatch's coverage and bring people to it, not simple fire off a little news on Twitter and let it drift, untethered to our site. That's very important, I think. Images, texts, add to that. I think to a point it's instinctual and it's timing. Everything starts with the question how can I grow the traffic/audience and do that for our site/paper? From there, you do kind of float with the rhythms of the news and the game. When and how to include readers comments into a liveblog/chat is far more art than science. That definitely takes a feel for the pulse of that particular liveblog/chat. Just like games, no two are the same ...
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:50:05 PM
    Commenta ()
  • That's pretty much how our Transfer Clockwatch works as well, one blog running the whole time and the numbers are crazy!
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:50:07 PM
    Commenta ()
  • I always talk about live sport having a certain pulse to them, and our live blogs should reflect the pace of that pulse. Sometimes an event can be all action and so that action should be the focus, sometimes it's a bit stop/start and sometimes it's just stop. The blog should reflect that the amount of comments, colour and links we bring into them and when we bring them in. Of course it also depends on the sport as well.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:51:11 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Instinct and timing - very good points, Derrick. Liveblogging is a craft, sometimes even an art. To do it really well, you have to have a lot of training, I think.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:52:23 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Right. Fill the quiet moments in a game. Capture the action. I always think of the liveblog for a game as a series of sidebars. Merely repeating the action doesn't do it. You can provide context for what has happened and then when nothing is happening start writing about what will ...
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:52:52 PM
    Commenta ()
  • That's true - it's very sport dependent. I think cricket lends itself best to real-time: slow, lots of banter/discussion, enough time to write proper analysis and lots of technical bits and pieces you can throw in too - I suppose it may be the similar for baseball...
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:53:24 PM
    Commenta ()
  • I agree, Tom. It's not just training. You need to have a lot of experimenting, too.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:53:28 PM
    Commenta ()
  • It is. Baseball is a great sport for liveblogging because of its sustained tension -- highlighted by spikes of unexpected action, which could come on any pitch.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:54:17 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Couldn't agree more, we're a broadcaster so we have to bear in mind that people could be watching what we're blogging on. Simply relaying that back isn't enough, we must add more...which is why our live blogs around the cricket are done from the commentary box, gives us a great chance to add that colour in and insight from our experts from off screen as well as on.
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:54:44 PM
    Commenta ()
  • In my experience it doesn't matter if you cover fast, action packed sports or slower sports such as cricket.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:55:12 PM
    Commenta ()
  • But you can't report on the one as you would do on the other.
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:55:49 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Yes @Robert - I love how you get the commentators to record quick videos to add to the live blog - really personal touch!
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:55:52 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Like always in this area, you have to try things. They don't always work but how else do you find that out, don't be afraid of getting no response to something because it's gone and onto the next thing soon enough. Those videos were a prime example...
    Sky Sports 8/6/2013 4:56:32 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Really interesting insight guys!
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:57:21 PM
    Commenta ()
  • I thing a good liveblog is always a good mixture of facts and emotions. Does that sound too simple?
    Tom Klein (hessenschau.de) 8/6/2013 4:57:29 PM
    Commenta ()
  • That sounds about right to me Tom!
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:57:53 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Not at all. A splash of analysis to complete the recipe. The exact mix depends on the audience, I suppose.
    Derrick Goold 8/6/2013 4:58:17 PM
    Commenta ()
  • Right - we've got time for one last question and it's only a wee one...
    robin.minchom 8/6/2013 4:58:21 PM
    Commenta ()
Offerto da ScribbleLive Content Marketing Software Platform