Real-time Journalism: il futuro della notizia
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Real-time Journalism: il futuro della notizia

Ovvero: il coinvolgimento del lettore nell'era del giornalismo post-industriale.

"Il tempo della notizia – news cycle – è passato dalle 24 ore ai 24 secondiIl real-time crea coinvolgimento alla luce - non a dispetto - di questo cambiamento"

Real-time Journalism - Il futuro della notizia fra liveblogging e coinvolgimento esplora il mondo del giornalismo in diretta e lancia la sfida dell'engagement del lettore: unica, vera unità di misura del mondo digitale.  

In parallelo con la pubblicazione di questo mio primo saggio in formato ebook, viene lanciata questa pagina come primo blog collettivo italiano sul tema, e approdo naturale per tutti i naviganti italiani nel mondo del giornalismo real-time. Consideratelo come un dialogo in tempo reale, invece che una monolitica vulgata:  un viaggio comune, non un soliloquio: così come auspico che sia il giornalismo del futuro.

Siete invitati - tecnici, giornalisti, curiosi e lettori - a commentare e inviare spunti di riflessione. 

Richiedete l'accesso alla piattaforma, e vi sarà dato. Potete usare il comodo box qui sotto. L'hashtag per la discussione è #realtimejourno: gli spunti colti su Twitter nutriranno questo liveblog, e viceversa. La mia email è lillo@ilmonella.com. 

  • And, of course, you feed the tweets and Touts into your website using ScribbleLive.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:12:40 PM
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  • Shauna, you made a great point that newsrooms should be making this look easy. Can you explain a bit about some successful training strategies you've seen?
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:13:32 PM
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  • Well, in the Star newsroom we've done a lot of training on Twitter over the years. We have offered sessions at a Twitter 101 basic level as well as advanced, often with the expert users training the beginners. As a result, many reporters live-tweet from news events without prompting.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:15:24 PM
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  • At Digital First, we are big fans of the ScribbleLive Training Wiki. You folks provide great training, Miles.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:15:36 PM
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  • We've done several of the Scribble trainings, too, and learned a lot.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:16:09 PM
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  • I include some aspect of live coverage in most of my newsroom visits, either in a formal workshop or individual coaching or both.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:16:33 PM
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  • As important as training is, the best way to learn live coverage is to try it with some routine events. Then you'll have sharp skills for when the big story breaks or the big event comes to town.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:17:09 PM
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  • We're fans of both the Scribble trainings and the free or inexpensive webinars offered by Poynter. We've also encouraged staffers to take advantage of webinars offered by Newspapers Canada.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:17:17 PM
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  • So, learn by doing seems to be the way to go.
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:18:13 PM
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  • Our training tends to be one-on-one, based on how tech-savvy people are. We have a newsroom full of years of experience, but sometimes people are intimidated when asked to tweet photos or videos. They think it will be hard. They just need someone to show them how easy it is.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:18:41 PM
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  • In line with that Teryl, we have an audience question from Dana Lacey.
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:19:38 PM
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  • I should note that Star staffers aren't required to live-tweet events but highly encouraged. If someone's new to it, we might encourage them to tweet from a minor event to start. Then when big news breaks they feel comfortable.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:19:38 PM
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  • How do you convince an old-school reporter -- who may be nervous or hostile about new tech -- to make the leap into digital?
    dana lacey 7/23/2013 4:19:42 PM
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  • Good question, Dana: The best way to help a reporter make the leap to digital is to show him or her how digital tools can help you do better journalism. It's all about good journalism and old-school reporters love good stories.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:20:50 PM
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  • One of my best-read blog posts ever, Dana, was my "Dear Newsroom Curmudgeon" letter, offering advice on this very question.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:22:06 PM
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  • I agree with Steve. Everyone is motivated by doing good journalism. Sometimes, we have to make the case that the digital work isn't added value -- it's part of our everyday expectations now. Dana, that's where I think one-on-one training can be helpful. They can ask questions without feeling bad. Once they start doing it, they tend to like the interaction and followers. They get a comfort level.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:23:11 PM
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  • A strategy that has worked with print reporters (old-school or otherwise): I point out that their work can reach a much wider audience if they use real-time digital tools to tell their stories.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:23:23 PM
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  • Non vedo ancora domande dal pubblico italiano .... timidi? :) basta cliccare sul bottone qui sopra. E' un'opportunità unica per fare domande a dei veri e propri guru del giornalismo d'oltreoceano.
    lillo 7/23/2013 4:23:36 PM
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  • When they see a story go viral, that makes for converts.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:24:11 PM
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  • I agree with Teryl! Show them the numbers. I find the Scribblelive blog stats to be great for that.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:25:04 PM
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  • Entice with great stories and reach-- that makes sense
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:25:51 PM
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  • Now let's talk about reporters at the other end of the spectrum: what do you look for when hiring interns or junior reporters? Are real-time skills must-haves?
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:26:52 PM
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  • Real-time skills help you get a job or an internship, but if you're willing to learn, they aren't a must-have.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:28:44 PM
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  • I don't hire staff but I have been on the hiring committee for our Radio Room interns. The Radio Roomers monitor police scanners and cover breaking news. Their ability to file quickly and accurately while juggling multiple stories is key to being successful in the job.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:29:56 PM
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  • Having real-time skills shows you're already there. While they aren't hard to learn, it makes a difference when hiring because an editor wants his/her job to be easier. Having someone coming in, already knowing how to do it and having a positive attitude about it -- that all makes a difference.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:31:18 PM
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  • In line with that, a question for Steve from Twitter
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:33:17 PM
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  • Hey guys, my question is for Steve. You've recently said that you'll hire a good reporter who is learning digital tools over an excellent reporter who isn't. Do you have any real life example of how this has worked out for you in the past? e.g. when digital skills have contributed a lot more to coverage than being an excellent reporter. Thanks.
    Katy 7/23/2013 4:33:18 PM
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  • Good question, Katy. Twitter proved itself useful to journalists five or six years ago. I worry about the mindset of a journalist who still is not using Twitter, however good an old-school reporter he or she is.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:34:50 PM
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  • That reporter is going to get his or her ass kicked on a major story soon (if it hasn't already happened).
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:35:14 PM
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  • I'm pretty good at teaching old-school journalism skills, and I think I can have an excellent digital journalist faster working with someone who's willing to learn than with someone who's resisting learning.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:36:02 PM
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  • I'm not going to name names, Katy, but I have seen excellent experienced journalists hold themselves back because they are unwilling to use new tools.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:36:34 PM
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  • And I've seen pretty good journalists blossom into excellent journalists because they are eager to learn.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:36:58 PM
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  • I'd rather have a journalist on the way up working for me than one on the way down, even if the declining on is right now at a higher altitude.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:37:35 PM
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  • Teryl, can you please talk about some obstacles editors and trainers might face when trying to increase the real-time skills of their newsroom?
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:38:31 PM
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  • To piggyback on what Steve said, attitude is critical. We have fewer editors than we've ever had before in most newsrooms today. They don't have the time to fight people to meet a basic expectation.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:38:39 PM
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  • Miles, a trainer is going to hear this: I don't have the time. You're already asking me to do so much, now you want me to tweet video, too? I'm not going to be able to do as many stories. The other problem may be resources -- whether a newsroom will invest in smart phones.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:40:47 PM
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  • When it comes to live reporting, perfection is still our accuracy standard. But an occasional typo or a clumsy run-on sentence is OK.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:41:00 PM
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  • Shauna, you have experience as a journalism instructor. What's the state of real-time skills being taught in schools? Do you find most students needs to seek out these skills on their own or are j-schools covering this adequately ?
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:44:57 PM
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  • Good question, Ivan, and thanks for asking it by video. I'd say hands-on is the best way. Open a chat and show the person how to get rolling. Then turn it over to him or her and give some feedback.

    Ivan Lajara 7/23/2013 4:45:58 PM
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  • I find that students often come in to j-school knowing how to use Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr, etc. which is great. But they don’t necessarily know how to use those AS JOURNALISTS and that's what needs to be taught. Just because they tweet often, that doesn't mean that they automatically know how to properly live-tweet a news event as a journalist.
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:46:57 PM
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  • I would say that journalism students have pretty good experience with the tools and understand new tools pretty intuitively. But they haven't learned to use them in real time. So you're teaching them real-time news judgment, verification, etc. more than you are teaching them how to figure out the Scribble dashboard.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:50:02 PM
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  • As we approach the end of our time together, I have a question for you all: what advice can you give to editors who are tasked with making their newsrooms real-time-savvy?
    Miles Kenyon 7/23/2013 4:52:56 PM
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  • I'd encourage the Nike approach: Just do it.
    stephenbuttry 7/23/2013 4:55:08 PM
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  • My advice: The carrot works better than the stick. Encouragement, praise and the stats to back up the success of experiments with real-time reporting will go a long way to achieving a real-time savvy newsroom. (As opposed to brow-beating and mandates that everyone must do it.)
    Shauna Rempel 7/23/2013 4:55:36 PM
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  • Be persistent, and be consistent yourself. Show that you are working the way you want others to work.
    Teryl Franklin, State Journal 7/23/2013 4:55:40 PM
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